Cold Pressed Controversy

Marketing Criticism + Physical Design

Pressed juices are yummy scrummy. Every well-meaning, diet-conscious, millennial wants some. 

But organic press also means publicity that is not paid for. Something that businesses find even more scrumptious.

These juices are all made from products whose brands have tried to capitalise on controversy. 

What

An art installation designed for the South London Gallery in Camberwell. It is a play on the term ‘organic press’ which refers to free publicity, as well as overpriced health drinks. Some companies achieve organic press through contentious advertising. So the artist bottled some products whose ads went viral and displayed them in a fridge.

Problem

The bottles needed to be branded in such a way that they could both: 

> be mistaken for a real juice  
> appear worthy of an art gallery

Solution

We crafted and splashed vibrant graphics and colour combinations across the bottles, embracing the fun-loving and youthful feel of juice companies. The copy on the bottles mimicked the quirky, self-referential language often seen on products aware of their own marketing. 

An art installation designed for the South London Gallery in Peckham. It is a play on the term ‘organic press’ which refers to free publicity, as well as overpriced health drinks. Some companies achieve organic press through contentious advertising. So the artist bottled some products whose ads had gone viral and displayed them in a fridge.

The bottles needed to be branded in such a way that they could both: 

> be mistaken for a real juice  
> appear worthy of an art gallery

We crafted and splashed vibrant graphics and colour combinations across the bottles, embracing the fun-loving and youthful feel of 21st century juice companies. The copy on the bottles also mimicked their quirky, self-referential language.

Royal Purple
#754A99
Fiery Rose
#F15E63
Burnt Sienna
#F08062
Tiffany Blue
#21B6B6
Lemon Yellow
#F9ED4C
Y in Mn Blue
#3956A3